Legal writing | business | hanson

You will submit 5 legal memos.  Your memos will be assessed on your accuracy and analysis.  Your memos should demonstrate clarity and precision, and, should include relevant (CanLii & CanLii Connects) legal research.  While the ‘McGill Guide’ is the preferred method of legal citation, I am happy to accept whatever citation method you are more comfortable with – please be consistent in your citations.  Please remember that you should not submit cases from the textbook, instead, please search for decisions of the BC Supreme Court (BCSC), the BC Court of Appeal (BCCA), or, the Supreme Court of Canada (SCC).  Please remember that your assignments provides additional options for your to consider, BCLRB for example.

While each assignment provides you with options, you may consider additional legal topics that are not listed in your assignments, but might be of interest to you.  For example, ‘mergers & acquisitions’ is not an option, but, if ‘M&A’ is of interest to you, please let me know.  Just as landlord tenant disputes are not listed as an option, but, if judicial review of the BC Residential Tenancy Branch decisions are of interest to you, please let me know. 

As you prepare your legal memos, you may choose any format we’ve discussed from OJEN to the Canadian Legal Research and Writing Guide.  Ultimately, the format you choose will determine the final assessment.  You must however, identify your choice in your search box.  At the end of your memo, your search box should include the following –

Search Box

Format – 

CanLii Search terms & operators (eg. liability /p damages) –

Style of cause & citation (eg. Mustapha v. Culligan of Canada Ltd., [2008] 2 SCR 114) 

Citied Cases, Treatment, NoteUp, or, Legislation –

CanLii Connects search term & operators (Title, Lawyers & Law Firm) – 

More specifically

Your analysis should ultimately be focused, purposeful, and, provide insight into your analysis of the reasons for judgement.

Your writing should be persuasive and reflect your critical thinking.

Your analysis should consider the internal consistency and authoritative claims to knowledge.

Your assertions should be well supported with relevant facts or examples.

Your analysis should also reflect a logical and coherent flow of ideas.

The language of your analysis should reflect rules of grammar, spelling and punctuation.

You may choose any citation style you are most comfortable with.